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Military Occupational Skills (MOS) / Careers

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Military Occupational Skills (MOS) / Careers

Critical MOS:  Looking for the best and only the best

By joining the Army National Guard, you will be preparing yourself for a rewarding civilian career. Earn while you learn. Get paid to learn! In the Army National Guard, you will learn valuable job skills while earning a regular paycheck and qualifying for tuition assistance.  Applicants must meet minimum qualifications.
 

19D: Cavalry Scout

Imagine being able to tell your next employer: In the Army National Guard, I protected lives and property by providing on-site intelligence to my commanding officer that consistently resulted in safe passage of armored columns through hostile zones. Pretty impressive, no matter what career you're going after. As a Cavalry Scout, you are the eyes and ears of the armored division. You move ahead of your armored division, provide reconnaissance, and report vital information back to your commanding officer. This enables the officer to make informed decisions. Duties may require you to secure and prepare ammunition on scout vehicles; operate individual and crew-served weapons; perform navigation during combat; serve as a member of observation and listening posts; gather and report information on terrain, weather, and enemy disposition and equipment; collect data to classify routes, tunnels, and bridges; employ principles of concealment and camouflage. Through training and practice in this specialty, you will develop qualities that are in demand by today's employers; qualities such as leadership, discipline, courage, and the ability to stay cool under pressure.
 

12B: Combat Engineer - Construction and Engineering Specialist

We're looking for team players to provide construction and engineering support vital to the successful outcome of Army National Guard missions. As a member of a Guard Combat Engineer team, you'll be designing and building bridges, roadways, secure perimeters, and tactical firing systems, as well as detecting and safely neutralizing mines and other dangers. In doing so, you will ensure the safe and timely mobility of other combat teams and materials. After your paid Guard training and experience, you will be qualified to pursue a variety of civilian career paths, including construction, building inspection, and building engineering.
 

92F: Petroleum Supply Specialist

Like all the vehicles on the road, the Army National Guard can't run without fuel. And it's the Petroleum Supply Specialist who makes sure we keep moving. As an Army National Guard Petroleum Supply Specialist you will ensure the proper handling, storage, and shipment of petroleum-based products, such as oil, fuel, and compressed gas. These are skills you will learn that could lead to a rewarding civilian career with oil refineries, pipeline companies, and tanker truck and ship lines. Petroleum Supply Specialists primarily supervise and manage the reception, storage, and shipping of bulk or packaged petroleum products. This may include operating specialized pumping equipment to load trucks, ships, trains, and aircraft; selecting and submitting samples of petroleum-based products for testing; performing petroleum and water accounting activities; testing petroleum samples for contamination; repairing specialized equipment; and being knowledgeable about facility safety procedures and storage guidelines. As your skills increase, so will your responsibilities. Advanced Petroleum Supply Specialists take on management duties, such as supervising and training other Soldiers, assigning duties and spot checking work quality, and assuring adherence to safety procedures.
 

88M: Truck Driver

Keep the Nation moving forward in the Army National Guard. In the Guard, the Truck Driver is the Soldier who makes sure other Soldiers and their supplies get where they need to go, either by supervising the transportation team or by operating the vehicle. This is the way the Guard Truck Driver plays an essential role in the accomplishment of many Guard missions and the skills you learn in the Guard will help prepare you for a career and future as a tractor-trailer, heavy truck, or bus driver. You will: Operate all wheeled vehicles and equipment over varied terrain and roadways for support of combat operations. Manage loading and unloading of personnel and cargo. Secure cargo against inclement weather, pilferage, and damage. Employ land navigation techniques. Operate vehicle mounted radios and weapons. Perform vehicle self-recovery and field expedients to include towing vehicles. Prepare vehicles for movement/shipment by air, rail, or vessel.
 

91B: Light-Wheel Vehicle Mechanic

Got a knack for keeping cars and trucks on the road? Then join the Army National Guard as a Light-Wheel Vehicle Mechanic and help keep freedom moving forward. As a Light-Wheel Vehicle Mechanic, you will have the opportunity to supervise and perform unit maintenance and recovery operations on gasoline - and diesel - fueled light-wheeled vehicles. In short, if it's on wheels, you'll work on it. And after your paid training, you'll be qualified to maintain and repair any number of vehicle systems and components, preparing you to step right into a civilian vehicle maintenance career.
 

74D: Chemical Operations Specialist

As an Army National Guard Chemical Operations Specialist, you'll be there and prepared whenever a community is flooded, an earthquake shakes the foundations of a city, a hurricane makes landfall, or an enemy uses biological or chemical warfare. You will know what to do to evacuate the area, control the situation, and solve the problem. In order to perform these functions, you will be trained to expertly handle nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) detection and decontamination equipment so you can assist in the application of NBC defense measures. You will also be asked to maintain disaster plans, operate and perform maintenance on smoke generating equipment, and coordinate with civilian personnel on what to do in an emergency. These are skills that are in demand by federal, state, and local governments, as well as civil defense agencies. So by joining the Army National Guard as a Chemical Operations Specialist, you will be preparing yourself for a rewarding civilian career.
 

13B: Cannon Crewmember - Weapons Systems Technician

As a Cannon Crewmember in the Army National Guard, you join a team that ensures the U.S. maintains its battlefield superiority. You will have the opportunity to learn and use high-tech cannon artillery weapons systems and artillery tactics and strategy – both of which translate into comparable civilian skills, such as familiarity with technology, strategic thinking, and decisiveness. Other duties include: Conducting wire and radio communications, Identifying target locations, Setting, loading, and firing artillery, Using computers to generate fire direction data, Operating heavy and light wheeled trucks and tracked vehicles, Transporting and managing artillery ammunition, Maintaining operational readiness of vehicles and equipment, And as your skills increase, so will your responsibilities. Advanced Crewmembers supervise other crewmembers in the distribution of ammunition, as well as manage cannon operations, training, and maintenance.
 

25U: Signal Support Systems Specialist

Communication is the heartbeat of any Army National Guard unit. By joining the Army National Guard as a Signal Support Systems Specialist, you will keep the information flowing by making sure all communications equipment is in top working order. And while you maintain signal support devices and terminals in the Army National Guard, you will be building skills that will help you in your civilian career.   Signal Support Systems Specialists are responsible for integrating signal systems and networks; performing signal support functions and unit-level maintenance on authorized signal equipment; and installing, operating, and maintaining radio and data distribution systems. In this role, you will train and provide technical assistance to users of signal equipment and learn to operate and perform preventative maintenance checks and services on vehicles and power generators.  And as your skills increase, so will your responsibilities. Advanced team members supervise and train other Soldiers; maintain and install signal support systems and terminal devices; provide technical assistance and training for automation and communications equipment; prepare maintenance and supply requests for unit-level signal support; and operate and perform preventative maintenance checks and services on assigned vehicles. Plus, the skills you learn will prepare you for a rewarding civilian career in communications equipment, radio, and teletype repair. These skills are also in demand by the federal government. Civilian positions may require additional study in electronics, where you will have the opportunity to qualify for certification as an Associate Certified Electronics Technician.  
 

19K: M1 Armor Crewman

For every tank or amphibious unit in the field, there's a team of highly trained professionals ensuring peak performance. And there's no one better than the Army National Guard at quickly mobilizing these vehicles to respond to any situation. So come on and join America's ability to shock and awe. As an M1 Armor Crewman, you will operate tanks like the M1A2 Abrams and other amphibious assault vehicles to engage and destroy the enemy. Your duties may require you to operate armored equipment, identify and pursue targets, and fire weapons to take out enemy forces or positions. While not directly related to any civilian position, you will familiarize yourself with the operation of the mechanics/repair industry. Plus, the discipline, teamwork, and leadership skills you develop as an M1 Armor Crewman can be applied in any civilian career.

 

Contact a Career Counselor.

Interested in being a member of our team?  Contact your local recruiter and get all the details about getting your career on track.

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